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As a little kid, I wanted to go to the north pole to find Superman’s crystal castle. Who didn’t, right? Like most kids, I was deprived of that opportunity, but I did travel to Alaska a few years later. Even as a preteen, I was a bit disappointed to find nothing suggesting crystal fortresses existed in the arctic.

Turns out I was just looking in the wrong place … all along it was in Mexico!

Superman Fortress of Solitude in Mexico

This real crystal cave was located by a Mexican mining company in 2000. Some of the massive crystals are over 35 feet long, considered to be among the world’s largest. Superman would have felt right at home.

via National Geographic

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12 Responses to “Superman’s Fortress of Solitude Found – in Mexico!”

  1. on 12 Apr 2007 at 11:20 pm VE

    What…no ice sculpture of Superman yet?

  2. on 12 Apr 2007 at 11:39 pm Anthony

    Wow, that really rocks!!! Well, technically, I guess it resonates at a particular harmonic frequency, but that’s not as fun to say…

    Anthony
    The Insane Membrane

  3. [...] Superman’s Fortress of Solitude Found – in Mexico! – The title really does say it all. [...]

  4. on 27 Apr 2007 at 12:46 pm Dek

    That is so cool, I wanna live there.

  5. on 27 Apr 2007 at 10:12 pm ya right

    I smell photoshop

  6. on 28 Apr 2007 at 1:27 am Check the link

    Check the National Geographic link dude. Don’t abuse skepticism.

  7. on 29 May 2007 at 6:25 am Rob

    Pretty neat, to bad those arnt the priceless crystals everyone covets… Thei’re salt crystals…

  8. on 18 Aug 2007 at 11:23 pm Tuan

    What, exactly, does Photoshop smell like?

  9. on 02 Nov 2007 at 11:33 am @Tuan

    What does Photoshop smell like? Same as Paint Shop Pro but more expensively.

  10. on 16 Nov 2007 at 4:06 pm esvl

    Huge, totally cool.

  11. on 27 Mar 2009 at 12:28 am Edward "Boracay Island hotel" Martin

    So, Superman must have been in Mexico all the time!! =)

  12. on 25 Oct 2010 at 5:08 pm dan

    Try and go there it’s like 130 degrees 90 percent humidity.

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